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    Manufacturer: Independent Publishers

    Lifting and Lifting Appliances Aboard Ship

    £112.00
    Lifting appliances on board ship, particularly ship’s cranes, are critical to a vessel earning freight. A ship is only earning money, ie, freight, when carrying cargo at sea. If the deck cranes are out of action in port the vessel will have downtime which in turn reduces the vessel’s earning capacity. For this reason, and the safety of the crew, ship’s cranes should be well maintained, usually whilst at sea, to reduce the possibility of port downtime.
    ISBN: 9786165772839
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    Author: Mike Wall

    Published July 2021

    Lifting appliances on board ship, particularly ship’s cranes, are critical to a vessel earning freight. A ship is only earning money, ie, freight, when carrying cargo at sea. If the deck cranes are out of action in port the vessel will have downtime which in turn reduces the vessel’s earning capacity. For this reason, and the safety of the crew, ship’s cranes should be well maintained, usually whilst at sea, to reduce the possibility of port downtime.

    Whilst they do not come under hull and machinery insurance, ship’s lifting appliances are required to be inspected by the ship’s Classification Society during construction, installation and regularly during the ship’s life. They are also inspected during P&I condition surveys to reduce the possibility of cargo damage and crew injury. For these reasons, their operation, maintenance, inspection and testing will be covered later together with survey aspects.

    However, the book is about lifting appliances aboard ship and there are other such appliances around a vessel which are considered, eg, engine room cranes, stores cranes, hose derricks, etc.

    Such subjects are not covered during study by merchant marine officers for their certificates of competency at marine college. It is only when an officer steps on board a ship for the first time that he starts to learn about such equipment and fittings. This book aims to give the reader a head-start when boarding a merchant vessel for the first time.

    Author: Mike Wall

    Published July 2021

    Lifting appliances on board ship, particularly ship’s cranes, are critical to a vessel earning freight. A ship is only earning money, ie, freight, when carrying cargo at sea. If the deck cranes are out of action in port the vessel will have downtime which in turn reduces the vessel’s earning capacity. For this reason, and the safety of the crew, ship’s cranes should be well maintained, usually whilst at sea, to reduce the possibility of port downtime.

    Whilst they do not come under hull and machinery insurance, ship’s lifting appliances are required to be inspected by the ship’s Classification Society during construction, installation and regularly during the ship’s life. They are also inspected during P&I condition surveys to reduce the possibility of cargo damage and crew injury. For these reasons, their operation, maintenance, inspection and testing will be covered later together with survey aspects.

    However, the book is about lifting appliances aboard ship and there are other such appliances around a vessel which are considered, eg, engine room cranes, stores cranes, hose derricks, etc.

    Such subjects are not covered during study by merchant marine officers for their certificates of competency at marine college. It is only when an officer steps on board a ship for the first time that he starts to learn about such equipment and fittings. This book aims to give the reader a head-start when boarding a merchant vessel for the first time.

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