Close
(0) items
You have no items in your shopping cart.
All Categories
    Filters
    Currency
    Search
    Manufacturers: IMAREST , Witherbys

    An Introduction to Ship Automation and Control Systems (Revised Edition)

    £95.00
    New revised edition February 2022
    ISBN: 9781914992384
    *

    Please select the required format.

    Ship to
    *
    *
    Shipping Method
    Name
    Estimated Delivery
    Price
    No shipping options

    Published: February 2022

     

    This publication provides a comprehensive introduction to onboard automation and operational safety. With high technical and educational value, it is suitable for marine engineers, students and all who wish to deepen their knowledge of a subject that is not only a technology but also a culture.

     

    ‘Automation is not only technology, but is, above all, a culture and man is at the centre of this process’ – Alex Stefani.

    This publication covers essential topics related to ship automation and control systems, including a brief history of automation on board ships; an introduction to automatic process control; automation systems equipment and technology; automation system design and engineering; alarms and monitoring; measuring devices and final control elements; automation systems project, testing and operation; advanced applications of automation systems; and future views of automation and control.

    The book is illustrated throughout with circuit diagrams and component/system schematics. It is an essential source of reference for both ship automation students and onboard engineers.

     

    Table of Contents

     

    Foreword

    About the Author

    Acknowledgements

    Chapter 1 A Brief History of Automation On Board Ships

    1.1 Introduction

    1.2 The Origin of Automation On Board Ships

    1.3 Notable Ships of the Future Projects

    1.3.1 ‘QE2’ Project

    1.3.2 The ‘Esquilino’ Project

    1.3.3 German ‘Ship of the Future’

    1.3.4 The Japanese ‘Pioneer Ship Programme’

    1.3.5 The Norwegian ‘Operating Vessel of the Future’

    1.3.6 The Danish ‘Project Ship’

    1.4 The Evolution of Automation Technology

    1.5 The Effects of Automation on the Crew

    1.6 Future Crew System

    Chapter 2 Introduction to Automatic Process Control

    2.1 Introduction

    2.2 A Brief History of Process Control Systems

    2.3 The Control Loop

    2.4 Process Control Definitions

    2.4.1 Other Process Control Terms

    2.5 Automatic Control Systems

    2.6 Process Control Characteristics

    2.7 Control Modes

    2.7.1 Discrete Controllers

    2.7.2 Continuous Controllers

    2.7.3 Proportional Control

    2.7.4 Integral (Reset) Control Mode

    2.7.5 Derivative Control Mode

    2.7.6 Proportional + Integral + Derivative (PID) Control Mode

    2.7.7 Summary

    2.8 Advanced Feedback Control Loops

    2.8.1 Cascade Control

    2.8.2 Split Range Control

    2.8.3 Ratio Control

    2.8.4 Feedforward Control

    2.9 Application Examples of Automatic Process Control Systems

    2.9.1 Diesel Engine Temperature Control System

    2.9.2 Steam Boiler Control Systems (Boiler Drum Level Control)

    2.9.3 Burner Combustion Control for Boilers

    2.9.4 Steam Temperature Control

    2.9.5 Burner Management System (BMS)

    2.10 Process Control Glossary

    Chapter 3 Automation Systems Equipment and Technology

    3.1 Introduction

    3.2 Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs)

    3.2.1 Central Processing Unit (CPU)

    3.2.2 The Memory System

    3.2.3 The Input/Output System

    3.2.4 Power Supply Unit

    3.2.5 PLC Operation

    3.2.6 PLC Selection

    3.3 PLC Programming Languages

    3.3.1 Ladder Diagram (LD)

    3.3.2 Functional Block Diagram (FBD)

    3.3.3 Sequential Function Chart (SFC)

    3.3.4 Instruction List (IL)

    3.3.5 Structured Text (ST)

    3.4 Process Automation Controllers

    3.5 Operator Workstations

    3.5.1 General

    3.5.2 Video Display Unit

    3.5.3 Operator Workstation Functional Overview

    3.6 Open Control Systems

    3.7 Information Management Systems

    3.8 Communication Networks

    3.8.1 Transport Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)

    3.8.2 Network Topologies

    3.8.3 Media Access Control

    3.8.4 Network Devices

    3.8.5 Industrial Ethernet

    3.8.6 Communication of Open Systems: ISO/OSI Layer Model

    3.9 Reliability, Availability and Redundancy

    3.10 Environmental Conditions

    3.11 Interference-free Electronics

    3.12 Glossary

    Chapter 4 Automation System Design and Engineering

    4.1 Introduction

    4.2 Basic Concepts

    4.3 Structure

    4.4 Propulsion Remote Control System

    4.4.1 Automatic Operation Mode

    4.4.2 Advanced RCS Architecture

    4.5 Remote Control System for Controllable Pitch Propeller

    4.5.1 Pitch Control

    4.5.2 RPM Control

    4.5.3 Pitch–RPM Command (Combinator or Constant Speed Mode)

    4.5.4 Load Control

    4.5.5 Load-increasing Program

    4.5.6 Load Sharing Program

    4.5.7 Pitch Indication and Back-up Control of Pitch/RPM

    4.5.8 Pitch Back-up Control

    4.5.9 RPM Back-up Control

    4.5.10 Manoeuvre Responsibility System

    4.6 Bridge Remote Control System of Electric Propulsion Systems

    4.6.1 Power Limitation System

    4.6.2 Torque and Speed Control

    4.6.3 Crash-stop

    4.6.4 Electric Propulsion Control Alarm System

    4.6.5 Electric Propulsion Safety System

    4.7 Power and Energy Management System (PMS and EMS)

    4.7.1 Introduction

    4.7.2 Marine Power System

    4.7.3 Power System Redundancy

    4.7.4 Power Management System

    4.7.5 PMS Functional Design Specification (FDS)

    4.7.6 Automatic Diesel Generator Start and Stop Sequence

    4.7.7 Diesel Generator Safety System

    4.7.8 Automatic Power Restoration Sequence Program

    4.8 Energy Management System

    4.8.1 Event-based Fast Load Reduction

    Chapter 5 Alarm and Monitoring

    5.1 Introduction

    5.2 Alarm Colour Coding

    5.3 Alarm Management

    5.3.1 Alarm Suppression

    5.3.2 Clear and Understandable Alarm Messages

    5.3.3 Recommended Corrective Action

    5.4 Other Monitoring and Control Functions

    5.5 Data Communication with Other Control Systems

    5.5.1 Other Communication Protocols

    5.6 Software Assessment

    5.6.1 Tests and Evidence

    5.6.2 Testing

    5.6.3 Software Duplication and Changes

    5.6.4 Software Maintenance Management

    5.7 Control Rooms and Operator Workplaces

    5.7.1 Ergonomics

    5.8 Alarm Management Glossary

    Chapter 6 Measuring Devices and Final Control Elements

    6.1 Introduction

    6.2 Measuring Devices

    6.3 Temperature Measurement

    6.3.1 Non-electric Temperature Sensors

    6.3.2 Electric/Electronic Thermometers

    6.3.3 Installation Considerations

    6.3.4 Role of Signal Conditioners

    6.4 Pressure Measurement

    6.4.1 Mechanical Pressure Gauges

    6.4.2 Electromechanical Pressure Sensors

    6.4.3 Trim, List and Draught Measurement with Pressure Transmitters

    6.5 Level Measurement

    6.5.1 Float Switches

    6.5.2 Magnetic Level Gauges

    6.5.3 Capacitive Level Gauges

    6.5.4 Conductive Level Gauges

    6.5.5 Ultrasonic Level Gauges

    6.5.6 Hydrostatic Level Gauges

    6.5.7 Microwave Level Gauges

    6.5.8 Level Measurement by Bubbler Pipes

    6.6 Flow Measurement

    6.6.1 Flowmeter Types

    6.6.2 Selecting a Flowmeter

    6.6.3 Installation and Maintenance

    6.7 Other Types of Sensors

    6.7.1 Torque and Power Meters

    6.7.2 Conductivity and pH Meters

    6.7.3 Gas Analysis

    6.7.4 Angular Speed and Limit Value Sensors

    6.7.5 Limit Value Sensors

    6.7.6 Oil Mist Detectors

    6.7.7 Viscosity Meters

    6.7.8 Water Ingress Detectors

    6.7.9 Measurement of Electrical Quantities

    6.7.10 Wireless Sensors and Networks

    6.8 Control Valves

    6.8.1 Seat Valves

    6.8.2 Butterfly Valves

    6.8.3 Ball and Ball Segment Valves

    6.8.4 Valve Sizing

    6.8.5 Valve Characteristics

    6.8.6 Valve Cavitation, Noise and Vibration

    6.8.7 Actuators and Positioners

    6.9 Sensors for Exhaust Gas Cleaning Systems

    6.9.1 Turbidity

    6.9.2 pH

    6.9.3 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    6.9.4 Exhaust Gas Analysis

    6.10 Glossary

    Appendix

    A6.1 Degrees of Protection for Electrical Equipment

    A6.1.1 IEC Classification

    A6.1.2 NEMA Classification

    A6.1.3 Conversion of NEMA Enclosures Type to IEC Classification Designations

    A6.2 Hazardous Area Classification – Europe

    A6.2.1 Zones

    A6.2.2 Gas Groups

    A6.2.3 Protection Types

    A6.2.4 Temperature Codes

    A6.3 ATEX Directive

    Chapter 7 Automation Systems Project, Testing and Operation

    7.1 Introduction

    7.2 Classification Society Rules

    7.2.1 Registro Italiano Navale (RINA) Rules for Automation Systems

    7.3 Failure Mode Effect Analysis

    7.3.1 FMEA Regulations

    7.3.2 FMEA/FMECA Procedure

    7.4 International Standards

    7.4.1 IEC 61508: Functional Safety of Electrical/Electronic/Programmable Electronic Safety-related Systems

    7.4.2 ISO 17894:2005 – Ships and marine technology – Computer applications – General principles for the development and use of programmable electronic systems in marine applications

    7.4.3 ISO 13407:1999 Human-centred design processes for interactive systems

    7.5 Automation Systems Project

    7.5.1 System Basic Requirements

    7.5.2 System Detailed Engineering and Specification

    7.5.3 Functional Design Specification

    7.5.4 Factory Acceptance Test

    7.5.5 System Installation

    7.5.6 System Testing

    7.5.7 Maintenance and Service

    7.5.8 Spare Parts

    Chapter 8 Advanced Applications of Automation Systems

    8.1 Condition-based Maintenance Systems

    8.1.1 Overall Equipment Effectiveness

    8.1.2 Maintenance Management

    8.1.3 Vibration Monitoring

    8.1.4 Vibration Measurement

    8.1.5 Oil Analysis

    8.1.6 Thermography

    8.1.7 Engine Performance Monitoring

    8.1.8 Electrical Equipment Condition Monitoring

    8.1.9 Integration of CBM with the Automation System

    8.1.10 Measuring the Performance of CBM

    8.2 Electronic Control of Diesel Engines

    8.2.1 Control Functions

    8.2.2 Electronic Governor Applications

    8.2.3 Multi-channel Tacho (MCT) System

    8.3 Dynamic Positioning (DP)

    8.3.1 History of DP

    8.3.2 Basic Principles of DP

    8.3.3 Modelling and Filtering

    8.3.4 Elements of a DP System

    8.3.5 Examples of DP Operations

    8.3.6 DP Vessel Operations

    8.3.7 Worksite Approach

    8.3.8 Final Setting-up

    8.3.9 Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (FMEA)

    8.3.10 Classification Society Notations

    8.3.11 Consequence Analysis

    8.3.12 Watchkeeping

    8.3.13 Checklists

    8.3.14 Dynamic Positioning Operator (DPO) Training

    8.3.15 Conclusions

    Chapter 9 Future Views of Automation and Control

    9.1 Introduction

    9.2 Global Vessel Management System

    9.2.1 Navigation System

    9.2.2 New Performance Standards of INS, a Further Step to Digital Navigation

    9.2.3 Bridge Navigational Watch Alarm System (BNWAS)

    9.2.4 INS – Conclusions

    9.3 Integrated Safety Management (ISM)

    9.4 HVAC Control

    9.5 Design Considerations

    9.6 Functional Integration

    9.6.1 Information Layers

    9.6.2 Machinery Condition Monitoring

    9.6.3 Fast Load Reduction

    9.6.4 Thruster Torque Control

    9.6.5 Simulation Models

    9.6.6 Advisory Systems

    9.6.7 Onboard Training System

    Chapter 10 Final Guidance and Conclusions

    10.1 Introduction

    10.2 Identified Problems

    10.3 Guidance for Crew Operating Automatic Control Systems

    10.4 Guidance to Shipowners and Shipmanagers

    10.5 A Design Model for an Integrated Automation System

    10.6 Selection Criteria of the Automation System Supplier

    10.7 Conclusions

    Chapter 11 MARINE 4.0: The Dawn of the Next Generation Ships is Now

    11.1 Introduction

    11.2 The Enabling Technologies

    11.2.1 Internet of Things

    11.2.2 Big Data and Data Analytics

    11.2.3 Connectivity

    11.3 Augmented Reality

    11.4 Horizontal and Vertical Integration

    11.5 Additive Manufacturing

    11.6 Blockchain

    11.7 Cyber Security

    11.8 Cloud Computing

    11.8.1 Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

    11.8.2 Platform as a Service (PaaS)

    11.8.3 Software as a Service (SaaS)

    11.9 Artificial Intelligence

    11.10 Digital Twin

    11.11 Radio-frequency Identification (RFID)

    11.12 The Path to the Autonomous Ship

    11.12.1 Levels of Automation and the Sheridan Scale

    11.12.2 Human-centred Automation

    11.13 Digital Applications

    11.13.1 ABB

    11.13.2 Wärtsilä

    11.13.3 Kongsberg Maritime/Rolls-Royce Marine

    11.14 Rules, Regulations and Standards

    11.14.1 International Maritime Organization

    11.14.2 Classification Societies

    11.14.3 Bureau Veritas

    11.14.4 Lloyd’s Register (LR)

    11.14.5 IMO Resolution MSC.302(87) (2010)

    11.14.6 OneNet

    11.15 Conclusions

    11.16 References

    Witherby Connect is the new online library solution for the maritime industry. Created by Witherbys’ in-house development team, Witherby Connect provides users with streamlined access to all major industry publications. 

    The browser-based hybrid software means that there is nothing to install and after publications are saved to the browser cache they can be accessed almost instantly both on and offline. This solution delivers more flexibility and security for those working at sea.

    Use on and offline: Witherby Connect provides flexible access. Publications can be viewed while connected to the internet and are downloaded to the browser’s cache for access offline, making it suitable for use even when internet access cannot be guaranteed.

    You can access Witherby Connect on any modern browser including: Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, Mozilla Firefox and Apple Safari.

    Published: February 2022

     

    This publication provides a comprehensive introduction to onboard automation and operational safety. With high technical and educational value, it is suitable for marine engineers, students and all who wish to deepen their knowledge of a subject that is not only a technology but also a culture.

     

    ‘Automation is not only technology, but is, above all, a culture and man is at the centre of this process’ – Alex Stefani.

    This publication covers essential topics related to ship automation and control systems, including a brief history of automation on board ships; an introduction to automatic process control; automation systems equipment and technology; automation system design and engineering; alarms and monitoring; measuring devices and final control elements; automation systems project, testing and operation; advanced applications of automation systems; and future views of automation and control.

    The book is illustrated throughout with circuit diagrams and component/system schematics. It is an essential source of reference for both ship automation students and onboard engineers.

     

    Table of Contents

     

    Foreword

    About the Author

    Acknowledgements

    Chapter 1 A Brief History of Automation On Board Ships

    1.1 Introduction

    1.2 The Origin of Automation On Board Ships

    1.3 Notable Ships of the Future Projects

    1.3.1 ‘QE2’ Project

    1.3.2 The ‘Esquilino’ Project

    1.3.3 German ‘Ship of the Future’

    1.3.4 The Japanese ‘Pioneer Ship Programme’

    1.3.5 The Norwegian ‘Operating Vessel of the Future’

    1.3.6 The Danish ‘Project Ship’

    1.4 The Evolution of Automation Technology

    1.5 The Effects of Automation on the Crew

    1.6 Future Crew System

    Chapter 2 Introduction to Automatic Process Control

    2.1 Introduction

    2.2 A Brief History of Process Control Systems

    2.3 The Control Loop

    2.4 Process Control Definitions

    2.4.1 Other Process Control Terms

    2.5 Automatic Control Systems

    2.6 Process Control Characteristics

    2.7 Control Modes

    2.7.1 Discrete Controllers

    2.7.2 Continuous Controllers

    2.7.3 Proportional Control

    2.7.4 Integral (Reset) Control Mode

    2.7.5 Derivative Control Mode

    2.7.6 Proportional + Integral + Derivative (PID) Control Mode

    2.7.7 Summary

    2.8 Advanced Feedback Control Loops

    2.8.1 Cascade Control

    2.8.2 Split Range Control

    2.8.3 Ratio Control

    2.8.4 Feedforward Control

    2.9 Application Examples of Automatic Process Control Systems

    2.9.1 Diesel Engine Temperature Control System

    2.9.2 Steam Boiler Control Systems (Boiler Drum Level Control)

    2.9.3 Burner Combustion Control for Boilers

    2.9.4 Steam Temperature Control

    2.9.5 Burner Management System (BMS)

    2.10 Process Control Glossary

    Chapter 3 Automation Systems Equipment and Technology

    3.1 Introduction

    3.2 Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs)

    3.2.1 Central Processing Unit (CPU)

    3.2.2 The Memory System

    3.2.3 The Input/Output System

    3.2.4 Power Supply Unit

    3.2.5 PLC Operation

    3.2.6 PLC Selection

    3.3 PLC Programming Languages

    3.3.1 Ladder Diagram (LD)

    3.3.2 Functional Block Diagram (FBD)

    3.3.3 Sequential Function Chart (SFC)

    3.3.4 Instruction List (IL)

    3.3.5 Structured Text (ST)

    3.4 Process Automation Controllers

    3.5 Operator Workstations

    3.5.1 General

    3.5.2 Video Display Unit

    3.5.3 Operator Workstation Functional Overview

    3.6 Open Control Systems

    3.7 Information Management Systems

    3.8 Communication Networks

    3.8.1 Transport Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)

    3.8.2 Network Topologies

    3.8.3 Media Access Control

    3.8.4 Network Devices

    3.8.5 Industrial Ethernet

    3.8.6 Communication of Open Systems: ISO/OSI Layer Model

    3.9 Reliability, Availability and Redundancy

    3.10 Environmental Conditions

    3.11 Interference-free Electronics

    3.12 Glossary

    Chapter 4 Automation System Design and Engineering

    4.1 Introduction

    4.2 Basic Concepts

    4.3 Structure

    4.4 Propulsion Remote Control System

    4.4.1 Automatic Operation Mode

    4.4.2 Advanced RCS Architecture

    4.5 Remote Control System for Controllable Pitch Propeller

    4.5.1 Pitch Control

    4.5.2 RPM Control

    4.5.3 Pitch–RPM Command (Combinator or Constant Speed Mode)

    4.5.4 Load Control

    4.5.5 Load-increasing Program

    4.5.6 Load Sharing Program

    4.5.7 Pitch Indication and Back-up Control of Pitch/RPM

    4.5.8 Pitch Back-up Control

    4.5.9 RPM Back-up Control

    4.5.10 Manoeuvre Responsibility System

    4.6 Bridge Remote Control System of Electric Propulsion Systems

    4.6.1 Power Limitation System

    4.6.2 Torque and Speed Control

    4.6.3 Crash-stop

    4.6.4 Electric Propulsion Control Alarm System

    4.6.5 Electric Propulsion Safety System

    4.7 Power and Energy Management System (PMS and EMS)

    4.7.1 Introduction

    4.7.2 Marine Power System

    4.7.3 Power System Redundancy

    4.7.4 Power Management System

    4.7.5 PMS Functional Design Specification (FDS)

    4.7.6 Automatic Diesel Generator Start and Stop Sequence

    4.7.7 Diesel Generator Safety System

    4.7.8 Automatic Power Restoration Sequence Program

    4.8 Energy Management System

    4.8.1 Event-based Fast Load Reduction

    Chapter 5 Alarm and Monitoring

    5.1 Introduction

    5.2 Alarm Colour Coding

    5.3 Alarm Management

    5.3.1 Alarm Suppression

    5.3.2 Clear and Understandable Alarm Messages

    5.3.3 Recommended Corrective Action

    5.4 Other Monitoring and Control Functions

    5.5 Data Communication with Other Control Systems

    5.5.1 Other Communication Protocols

    5.6 Software Assessment

    5.6.1 Tests and Evidence

    5.6.2 Testing

    5.6.3 Software Duplication and Changes

    5.6.4 Software Maintenance Management

    5.7 Control Rooms and Operator Workplaces

    5.7.1 Ergonomics

    5.8 Alarm Management Glossary

    Chapter 6 Measuring Devices and Final Control Elements

    6.1 Introduction

    6.2 Measuring Devices

    6.3 Temperature Measurement

    6.3.1 Non-electric Temperature Sensors

    6.3.2 Electric/Electronic Thermometers

    6.3.3 Installation Considerations

    6.3.4 Role of Signal Conditioners

    6.4 Pressure Measurement

    6.4.1 Mechanical Pressure Gauges

    6.4.2 Electromechanical Pressure Sensors

    6.4.3 Trim, List and Draught Measurement with Pressure Transmitters

    6.5 Level Measurement

    6.5.1 Float Switches

    6.5.2 Magnetic Level Gauges

    6.5.3 Capacitive Level Gauges

    6.5.4 Conductive Level Gauges

    6.5.5 Ultrasonic Level Gauges

    6.5.6 Hydrostatic Level Gauges

    6.5.7 Microwave Level Gauges

    6.5.8 Level Measurement by Bubbler Pipes

    6.6 Flow Measurement

    6.6.1 Flowmeter Types

    6.6.2 Selecting a Flowmeter

    6.6.3 Installation and Maintenance

    6.7 Other Types of Sensors

    6.7.1 Torque and Power Meters

    6.7.2 Conductivity and pH Meters

    6.7.3 Gas Analysis

    6.7.4 Angular Speed and Limit Value Sensors

    6.7.5 Limit Value Sensors

    6.7.6 Oil Mist Detectors

    6.7.7 Viscosity Meters

    6.7.8 Water Ingress Detectors

    6.7.9 Measurement of Electrical Quantities

    6.7.10 Wireless Sensors and Networks

    6.8 Control Valves

    6.8.1 Seat Valves

    6.8.2 Butterfly Valves

    6.8.3 Ball and Ball Segment Valves

    6.8.4 Valve Sizing

    6.8.5 Valve Characteristics

    6.8.6 Valve Cavitation, Noise and Vibration

    6.8.7 Actuators and Positioners

    6.9 Sensors for Exhaust Gas Cleaning Systems

    6.9.1 Turbidity

    6.9.2 pH

    6.9.3 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    6.9.4 Exhaust Gas Analysis

    6.10 Glossary

    Appendix

    A6.1 Degrees of Protection for Electrical Equipment

    A6.1.1 IEC Classification

    A6.1.2 NEMA Classification

    A6.1.3 Conversion of NEMA Enclosures Type to IEC Classification Designations

    A6.2 Hazardous Area Classification – Europe

    A6.2.1 Zones

    A6.2.2 Gas Groups

    A6.2.3 Protection Types

    A6.2.4 Temperature Codes

    A6.3 ATEX Directive

    Chapter 7 Automation Systems Project, Testing and Operation

    7.1 Introduction

    7.2 Classification Society Rules

    7.2.1 Registro Italiano Navale (RINA) Rules for Automation Systems

    7.3 Failure Mode Effect Analysis

    7.3.1 FMEA Regulations

    7.3.2 FMEA/FMECA Procedure

    7.4 International Standards

    7.4.1 IEC 61508: Functional Safety of Electrical/Electronic/Programmable Electronic Safety-related Systems

    7.4.2 ISO 17894:2005 – Ships and marine technology – Computer applications – General principles for the development and use of programmable electronic systems in marine applications

    7.4.3 ISO 13407:1999 Human-centred design processes for interactive systems

    7.5 Automation Systems Project

    7.5.1 System Basic Requirements

    7.5.2 System Detailed Engineering and Specification

    7.5.3 Functional Design Specification

    7.5.4 Factory Acceptance Test

    7.5.5 System Installation

    7.5.6 System Testing

    7.5.7 Maintenance and Service

    7.5.8 Spare Parts

    Chapter 8 Advanced Applications of Automation Systems

    8.1 Condition-based Maintenance Systems

    8.1.1 Overall Equipment Effectiveness

    8.1.2 Maintenance Management

    8.1.3 Vibration Monitoring

    8.1.4 Vibration Measurement

    8.1.5 Oil Analysis

    8.1.6 Thermography

    8.1.7 Engine Performance Monitoring

    8.1.8 Electrical Equipment Condition Monitoring

    8.1.9 Integration of CBM with the Automation System

    8.1.10 Measuring the Performance of CBM

    8.2 Electronic Control of Diesel Engines

    8.2.1 Control Functions

    8.2.2 Electronic Governor Applications

    8.2.3 Multi-channel Tacho (MCT) System

    8.3 Dynamic Positioning (DP)

    8.3.1 History of DP

    8.3.2 Basic Principles of DP

    8.3.3 Modelling and Filtering

    8.3.4 Elements of a DP System

    8.3.5 Examples of DP Operations

    8.3.6 DP Vessel Operations

    8.3.7 Worksite Approach

    8.3.8 Final Setting-up

    8.3.9 Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (FMEA)

    8.3.10 Classification Society Notations

    8.3.11 Consequence Analysis

    8.3.12 Watchkeeping

    8.3.13 Checklists

    8.3.14 Dynamic Positioning Operator (DPO) Training

    8.3.15 Conclusions

    Chapter 9 Future Views of Automation and Control

    9.1 Introduction

    9.2 Global Vessel Management System

    9.2.1 Navigation System

    9.2.2 New Performance Standards of INS, a Further Step to Digital Navigation

    9.2.3 Bridge Navigational Watch Alarm System (BNWAS)

    9.2.4 INS – Conclusions

    9.3 Integrated Safety Management (ISM)

    9.4 HVAC Control

    9.5 Design Considerations

    9.6 Functional Integration

    9.6.1 Information Layers

    9.6.2 Machinery Condition Monitoring

    9.6.3 Fast Load Reduction

    9.6.4 Thruster Torque Control

    9.6.5 Simulation Models

    9.6.6 Advisory Systems

    9.6.7 Onboard Training System

    Chapter 10 Final Guidance and Conclusions

    10.1 Introduction

    10.2 Identified Problems

    10.3 Guidance for Crew Operating Automatic Control Systems

    10.4 Guidance to Shipowners and Shipmanagers

    10.5 A Design Model for an Integrated Automation System

    10.6 Selection Criteria of the Automation System Supplier

    10.7 Conclusions

    Chapter 11 MARINE 4.0: The Dawn of the Next Generation Ships is Now

    11.1 Introduction

    11.2 The Enabling Technologies

    11.2.1 Internet of Things

    11.2.2 Big Data and Data Analytics

    11.2.3 Connectivity

    11.3 Augmented Reality

    11.4 Horizontal and Vertical Integration

    11.5 Additive Manufacturing

    11.6 Blockchain

    11.7 Cyber Security

    11.8 Cloud Computing

    11.8.1 Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

    11.8.2 Platform as a Service (PaaS)

    11.8.3 Software as a Service (SaaS)

    11.9 Artificial Intelligence

    11.10 Digital Twin

    11.11 Radio-frequency Identification (RFID)

    11.12 The Path to the Autonomous Ship

    11.12.1 Levels of Automation and the Sheridan Scale

    11.12.2 Human-centred Automation

    11.13 Digital Applications

    11.13.1 ABB

    11.13.2 Wärtsilä

    11.13.3 Kongsberg Maritime/Rolls-Royce Marine

    11.14 Rules, Regulations and Standards

    11.14.1 International Maritime Organization

    11.14.2 Classification Societies

    11.14.3 Bureau Veritas

    11.14.4 Lloyd’s Register (LR)

    11.14.5 IMO Resolution MSC.302(87) (2010)

    11.14.6 OneNet

    11.15 Conclusions

    11.16 References

    Product tags